Edward Schocker

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Song of Undoing #1

Work for 1/4 Tone Meantone Temperamnt. Performed by the Bertamo Trio. Performed live at Center for New Music.

Tish Berlin -Baroque Recorder
Yuko Tanaka -Harpsichord
David Morris -Viola Da Gamba

 

Sanjo

live performance with Korean trio JUL.

Sho Improvisation

Sho is a traditional Japanese wind instrument found in the Gagaku Orchestra.

 

Hymn for Lou & Bill

“Hymn for Lou & Bill” is written for any two wind instruments. The notational system of this piece uses many qualities of the ancient Korean system called Chung-Kan-Po. This notation is composed of a chart where each rectangle represents one metric unit, and like the ancient Korean system, this piece is organized into six groups (Kang) of 3-2-3-3-2-3.

I hope Hymn for Lou & Bill will show that notation systems greatly influence the performance characteristics of a piece. Like ancient music notations, I have not added any dynamic, phrasing, or tempo markings. As a result of this, it is my hope that the performers will use this opportunity to create their own awareness of the piece, and hence add their own personal and stylistic interpretations.

This piece is written in memory of Lou Harrison and Bill Colvig.

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Netori

“Netori” is for two electric guitars with ebow and wah-wah pedal. The guitars are used as drone instruments and to create counterpoints using the overtone series that arises through the drowned tones.

Netori is a term used in Japanese Gagaku music. The word literally means “sound catcher” and is a prelude in free rhythm to set the tonality for the music to follow. This piece works much in the same way as a traditional netori, but instead uses the relationships between two different overtone series to set the tonality.

Netori was premiered on May 28, 2006 at The Now Music Festival in San Francisco, and the work is dedicated to Pauline Oliveros.

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“Edward Schocker’s Netori, which was played on 2 electric guitars by Nathan Clevenge and Wayne Grim. This slowly elongated pitch — 2 actually — which grew to almost ear-splitting intensity was meant to evoke the tuning of a gagaku – (Japanese court music ensemble), and its loudness was as loud or louder than Glenn Branca’s stuff which I caught once at, if memory serves, a performance space in Manhattan’s West Village. It did so superbly, and the fact that a lot of the audience swore they hated it was evidence of its power. Music should shake things up. This piece certainly did.” –

I Have Five Things To Say

“I Have Five Things To Say” was written for The Music For People And Thingamajiggs concert held on April 20th 1998 at Mills College. The piece incorporates nontraditional instruments with nontraditional notation in order to create its own musical language. This is done so that not only musicians can perform this piece, but also non-musicians who can not read traditional music notation. The piece calls for instruments that can be built by anyone with the proper tools and materials; and which, can be found at any blacksmith, hardware store, and/or junkyard. The piece calls for six players and one conductor to give cues.

The length of I Have Five Things To Say is to be determined by the conductor, but I recommend that the piece last between 10 to 15 minutes in length. I Have Five Things To Say is dedicated to Dylan Bolles.

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